Category: Rabbit storytime

(Fill-in-the-Blank)’s Colorful Day

(Fill-in-the-Blank)’s Colorful Day

These stories are inspired by Read It Again and The Wielded Pen. These stories are variations of Dog’s Colorful Day by Emma Dodd.

Dino's Colorful Day

I’ll be using Dino’s Colorful Day for the Dig Into Reading theme this summer. You can tell the children that brachiosaurus were plant eaters. Choose a color and ask them what kinds of foods the dinosaur could eat that was that color. (I’ve included a list of colored foods below.) Here’s a little rhyme you can use as you place each color on him:

I’m a great big dinosaur
I eat plants, I’m an herbivore.
I love food, but I have none,
So step right up and give me some.

Mouse's Colorful Day

You can cut out Mouse and do a “Lunch by Denise Fleming” type of story using the same colorful circles.

I’m a little mousie, light and furry.
I’m always in such a hurry.
Look at the clock it’s time for lunch.
Now give me something that I can munch.

Bunny's Colorful Day

Or, you can use Bunny’s Colorful Day and use spring flowers. This is a great vocabulary-building exercise.

I’m a little bunny and I love to hop.
When I start, it’s hard to stop.
But when it comes to flowers I like to dwell.
So bring me something that I can smell.

What is Bridget Reading? featured a similar story in last week’s Flannel Friday roundup of I Know a Wee Piggy. For more flannel ideas check out Bridget’s blog or Flannel Friday.

Color Food Plant
red berries, apple, cherries, cranberries barberry, rose, poppy
blue berries, potatoes wild indigo
gray oysters, mushrooms wormwood
yellow spaghetti, squash, honey, corn, lemongrass, pineapple daisy, sunflower, daffodil
pink watermelon, rhubarb, grapefruit magnolia, peony
purple eggplant, cabbage, plum, blackberries violet, lavender, hyacinth
black sesame seeds, beans, seaweed black swan, iris, queen of night tulips
brown whole wheat pasta, toast, almonds sycamore “helicopter” seeds
orange nectarines, papayas, cantaloupe, mango, carrots lion’s tail, aloe, day lily, Chinese lanterns
green asparagus, avocado, celery, bok choy, broccoli, cucumber, edamame, fennel, honeydew, kale, spinach fern, gingko
white cauliflower, tofu, coconut, onion, turnip magnolia, laurel
Duck! Rabbit!

Duck! Rabbit!

This is the time of year I read Amy Krouse Rosenthal’s Duck! Rabbit! to every child in a fifty-mile radius! I just love this story. I decided to make a flannel for this story so I can mix up my programs with a book and a flannel. It didn’t take much time or felt, and the kids love it!

Duck! Rabbit!

Here’s the original book.

Bread Carrot

Here’s the part where the duck eats bread and the rabbit eats a carrot.

Swamp Grass

This is when the duck hides in the swamp and the rabbit hides in the grass.

Drinking Cooling Off

This is when the duck is drinking water and the rabbit is so hot, he’s dunking his ears to cool off.

I like to use my lap board to make the duck fly and the rabbit hop. And the kids love putting on their binoculars to get a closer look!

Anteater Brachiosaurus

My favorite part is the last page where I say, “Oh look. I’ve found an anteater.” The children don’t need any prompting to yell out, “That’s not an anteater, that’s a dinosaur!” I wrote a sequel called Anteater! Brachiosaurus! if you’re interested. I’ll be using it for the summer reading program this year, and for lots of dinosaur storytimes in the future.

Here’s an easy craft to go along with the story:

Duck Rabbit Craft

For more flannel ideas check out In the Children’s Room blog. Or visit Flannel Friday.

White Rabbit’s Color Book

White Rabbit’s Color Book

White Rabbit Buckets

I had quite a find at the dollar store this week! I’ve been looking for a while for primary colored buckets to use for White Rabbit’s Color Book and finally found them! Just in time for spring.

A little prep work is required to tell this story, but it’s well worth it in the end:

First, you need to cut felt “paint” to fit in the bottom of each bucket. Put a Velcro tab in one corner to keep it in place to cover up the bunnies.

Felt bottomRabbits hiding in red bucket

Then, you need to cut out different colored rabbits to fit inside your buckets. You’ll need:

  • white
  • yellow
  • green
  • double-sided orange and white rabbit to fit inside
  • red
  • brown
  • blue
  • double-sided purple and white rabbit to fit inside

For the purple and orange rabbits, you’ll need to fold a piece of felt in half and cut a smaller white rabbit to place inside. The rabbit takes a shower and turns white again. I use a sponge to “wash” the orange and purple off. The felt sticks to each other well, but you can always add a transparent tab of Velcro if you need to.

Rabbit TemplateOrange rabbit

You can load each bucket in the following way: I’ve included a Word template of the story White Rabbit, along with the way to load the buckets in order for storytelling, and a song I found that you can sing as you pull the colored rabbits out of the buckets.

Yellow bucketRed bucketBlue bucket

For more flannel ideas, check out the What Happens in Storytime blog for this week’s Flannel Friday, or visit Flannel Friday.

Little Rabbit Who Liked to Say Moo

Little Rabbit Who Liked to Say Moo

Little Rabbit Who Liked to Say Moo

Even though there’s still snow on my lawn, spring is officially here. To celebrate, I’m breaking out my bunny stories. I recently made a flannel for The Little Rabbit Who Liked to Say Moo. The preschoolers love this story. I like to sing the wrong versions of Old MacDonald to gear them up for this one. In addition to making the farm animals, I made speech bubbles to promote pre-reading skills.

Moo

Little Rabbit said, “Moo.”

Baa

Cow came over and asked Little Rabbit why he was saying Moo. Little Rabbit said that he liked to. Cow asked Little Rabbit if he could make any other sounds. Little Rabbit said, “Baa.”

Oink

Sheep came over and asked Little Rabbit why he was saying Baa. Little Rabbit said that he liked to. Sheep asked Little Rabbit if he could make any other sounds. Little Rabbit said, “Oink.”

Hee Haw

Pig came over and asked Little Rabbit why he was saying Oink. Little Rabbit said that he liked to. Pig asked Little Rabbit if he could make any other sounds. Little Rabbit said, “Hee Haw.”

Quack

Donkey came over and asked Little Rabbit why he was saying Hee Haw. Little Rabbit said that he liked to. Donkey asked Little Rabbit if he could make any other sounds. Little Rabbit said, “Quack.”

Duck

Duck came over and asked Little Rabbit why he was saying Quack. Little Rabbit said that he liked to. Duck asked Little Rabbit if that was his favorite sound. Rabbit thought about it for a minute and said, “No, this is my favorite sound.”

Woof

You can also use puppets for this story and use a lap board to put up only the speech bubbles.

Here’s a craft to use (you can color, paint, dot, etc.): Little Rabbit Craft

Here’s a video of how to do a one-person puppet show with this story:

If you don’t have all the puppets from the book, watch this clip to see how you can change the story to fit your needs:

For more flannel ideas check out the Trails & Tales blog this week. She’s hosting Flannel Friday.

This is Not a Box

This is Not a Box

Not a Box

I love this book! It’s so fun and creative, but it’s slightly small to use with big storytime groups. I decided to make a prop to tell this story for my big groups and outreach storytimes. Here’s how:

Box

Take a plain cardboard box (you may have one kicking around, if not you can purchase one for a couple of dollars at the office supply store) and fold the sides in the top down. Cut off the top pieces of whichever side you want to face the children. Using a hole punch, punch a hole on each side of the box.

Threaded Story

Using scrap pieces of cardboard, cut out nine pieces to accompany each scene in the book. Draw the picture on one side and dialogue on the back side using black and red permanent markers. Using two book rings (I used 2″ ones) thread the story backward on the rings with the dialogue facing you. (When you cut the pieces out, make sure they will fit in and out of the box on the rings easily.)

Not a Box

Here is the Not-a-Box! When I tell the story I use my rabbit puppet and the kids love it!

For more ideas to use in storytime, check out Courtney’s blog. She’s hosting Flannel Friday this week.

Theme: Overlay by Kaira